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Budapest

Budapest is one of the ten most frequently visited European cities, and, according to a recent survey, one of the ten most photographed cities in the world by tourists. Budapest has a distinct identity that is being reaffirmed, and its cultural life is characterised by a diversity drawing on many traditions. The Hungarian capital is a confident as well as an accepting city. Its natural beauty, its architectural heritage, its unique atmosphere, and its rich cultural palette have always been a cherished treasure, and always will be.

The Széchenyi Chain Bridge (Hungarian: Széchenyi lánchíd) is a suspension bridge that spans the River Danube between Buda and Pest, the western and eastern sides of Budapest, the capital of Hungary. Designed by the English engineer William Tierney Clark and built by the Scottish engineer Adam Clark, it was the first permanent bridge across the Danube in Hungary.
Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budavári Palota) is the historical castle and palace complex of the Hungarian kings in Budapest. It was first completed in 1265, but the massive Baroque palace today occupying most of the site was built between 1749 and 1769. The complex in the past was referred to as either the Royal Palace (Hungarian: Királyi-palota) or the Royal Castle (Hungarian: Királyi Vár, German: Königliche Burg).
The Hungarian Parliament Building (Országház, which translates to House of the Country or House of the Nation), also known as the Parliament of Budapest for being located in that city, is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. It lies in Lajos Kossuth Square, on the bank of the Danube. It is currently the largest building in Hungary and still the tallest building in Budapest.
Hősök tere (English: Heroes' Square) is one of the major squares in Budapest, Hungary, noted for its iconic statue complex featuring the Seven Chieftains of the Magyars and other important national leaders, as well as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The square lies at the outbound end of Andrássy Avenue next to City Park (Városliget). It hosts the Museum of Fine Arts and the Műcsarnok. The square has played an important part in contemporary Hungarian history and has been a host to many political events, such as the reburial of Imre Nagy in 1989.

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